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ABOUT US

The Association of Latino Superintendents and Administrators (ALAS) was created by a group of Latino superintendents and administrators who met through the spring of 2003 to discuss the organizational structure, philosophy and goals of forming a national organization. ALAS not only serves as an acronym for the Association of Latino Administrators & Superintendents but was intentionally selected as a word in the Spanish language that means wings. It hoped that the Association will generate wings to success for Latino educators.

The organizing members received support from the American Association of School Administrators (AASA), the California Latino Superintendents' Association (CALSA), and the Association of California School Administrators (ACSA). ALAS was formally established in the summer of 2003, and as an affiliate of the American Association of School Administrators (AASA), AASA has committed to partner in establishing ALAS to bring sharp focus to and support for Latino educational leaders and issues. AASA’s mission, as the professional organization for over 14,000 educational leaders across America, is to support and develop effective school system leaders. Currently, less than one percent of AASA’s membership is Latino. Now, more than ever, the need exists to create a national association focused on identifying, training, and supporting Latino school administrators and superintendents.

A VOICE FOR LATINOS
By the year 2025, Latino children will make up 25 percent of the school-age population. In the nation’s largest states - California, Texas, Florida, and New York - Latinos already have reached that level. Addressing the needs of the fastest growing minority in the United States - the Latino community is vital to the national interest. Latinos have become the new "America’s largest minority." ALAS serves a voice for Latinos in the United States. This ever growing country is uniquely enriched by large numbers of Latino subgroups, i.e. Mexican-Americans, Puerto Ricans, Cubans, Dominicans, and Latin Americans.