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SLA COHORT VII-CLAUDIO CORIA

Claudio Coria
Executive Director, Leadership, Phoenix Union High School District, Phoenix, AZ

What is your current role?

Executive Director, Leadership

What is the enrollment of your current school district?

27,813 (9th-12th grade students)

What are some of your career highlights?

Career highlights include:

Served as principal for 10 years. Five years as a middle school principal and an additional 5 at a large urban high school. For 22 years I have worked in public education and proudly served teachers and students in Title 1 schools. 

What are you most proud of professionally?

I am most proud of being an integral part of the team that helped transform Alhambra High School into one of the most successful schools in the Phoenix Union High School District.  As the principal I lead the school community to leverage the strengths of the teachers, staff and students and work as a team to create a new positive and supportive school culture focused on high expectations for everyone.  As result, Alhambra High has become a great place for students to learn and teachers to work.   
 
What is one of the biggest challenges facing educators today?

One of the biggest challenges facing public education today is the lack of teachers.  This problem is especially pronounced in rural and urban communities. Low pay and regular negative talk from local and national politicians about teachers and public education has pushed many talented would be teachers into other career fields. The literature is clear - highly skilled and resourceful teachers make a significant difference in the learning and success of their students.   It’s quite evident our students need more talented and caring people to teach them.

Why is a program like SLA important for Latino educators?

Programs like SLA are important to Latino educators because it allows us to network and learn from one another.  It also provides us access to learn from successful people already serving as superintendents. These insights help participants to reflect on self and honestly assess our strengths and areas of growth as we journey toward superintendent.